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Cancer - Open Trials

Leighton Hospital’s Oncology Research Department is actively involved in clinical research and has many studies currently open to recruitment across seven different disease areas.

If you would like to know more about getting involved in any clinical research in any of these areas please contact the Oncology Research Department on 01270 273486

OPEN TRIALS

BREAST

B-Ahead3


Two thirds of women who receive chemotherapy for secondary breast cancer are above an ideal weight and often have relatively large stores of body fat with reduced amounts of muscle. Many women gain fat and lose muscle during chemotherapy which may influence the effectiveness and side effects of chemotherapy. This trial will test whether following a diet and exercise programme during chemotherapy can help to reduce fat stores and maintain muscle more effectively than exercise alone.  The study will assess the effects of the diet on both the activity of the chemotherapy (how successful it is in controlling the breast cancer) and its toxicity (how many side effects women have on treatment).

Add Aspirin

This study is testing whether taking aspirin regularly after treatment for early stage cancer stops or delays the cancer coming back.  The study is testing different doses of aspirin. Some people will receive a dummy drug (placebo). 

Horizons

Patients will have a diagnosis of either breast cancer who are under 50 years old, gynaecological cancer or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Recruitment will take place prior to treatment from hospitals across the UK.  This study wishes to look at how a diagnosis of cancer and its treatment affects a person’s life over time.

Posnoc 

Currently, women having surgical treatment for their breast cancer also undergo removal of the first one or two lymph glands (sentinel nodes) from the armpit (axilla) to check if the cancer has spread to the lymph glands. This procedure is called sentinel node biopsy. For about a quarter of women, the breast cancer has spread to their sentinel nodes. Currently, these women undergo treatment to their armpit (axillary treatment). This is either a second operation to remove all the lymph glands in the armpit (axillary node clearance) or radiotherapy to the armpit (axillary radiotherapy) depending on local hospital practice.  Evidence from previous research suggests that armpit treatment may not influence the risk of the cancer coming back in the armpit, or anywhere else. However, this research was not of high enough quality, and the studies were too small, to give a clear answer.  The purpose of doing this study is because it is not yet known whether armpit treatment is worthwhile.  

Mammo-50

This study is testing the optimal frequency of mammograms after breast cancer surgery for women who are aged 50 years and over. This is to ensure that women receive enough mammograms to detect any cancer recurrences promptly and to offer further treatment appropriately, but not so many that they cause undue anxiety and become too costly for both individuals and the health service.  The study also wishes to find out about other methods of follow up which take place such as clinic visits to see the patients doctor, visits to see the breast care nurse or telephone follow up, and how these affect patients' quality of life.

Bridging the Age Gap

A great deal of scientific research has been done to ensure that every woman with breast cancer gets the best treatment for her cancer. However, much of this research has been carried out on women under the age of 70.  This means breast cancer specialists have much less scientific evidence to guide the treatment of women over 70.  This study is trying to address this problem and gather detailed information about how older women with breast cancer are treated and how well they do. The study is also trying to understand how doctors, nurses and patients discuss treatment options and make decisions about treatment. We hope that the results will help us support doctors, nurses and patients make treatment decisions in the future.

BOWEL

Focus4 

study for patients receiving a course of treatment for bowel (colorectal) cancer.  The aim of the FOCUS4 study is to find a good treatment for the patients particular type of cancer after they have finished their initial treatment. 

Impress

A study for patients who have been diagnosed with a mass in the sigmoid colon.  MRI has helped to improve success rates of surgery of the rectum since it provides more information than the CT.  Many centres now use it for evaluating the sigmoid, too, but it is not necessarily offered to all patients as no-one has studied what additional value it provides compared with a CT scan. The study wants to test whether the information from the MRI gives more accurate information than the CT scan. This trial will also enable us to find out whether having an MRI scan prior to surgery could improve the treatment choices offered to patients.

Add Aspirin

The study is testing whether taking aspirin regularly after treatment for early stage cancer stops or delays the cancer coming back.  The study is testing different doses of aspirin. Some people will receive a dummy drug (placebo). 

HEAD AND NECK

Head and Neck 5000  

A study for existing participants in the Head and Neck 5000 study, a large UK-wide study of people with head and neck cancer. As part of the main study, patients were asked to complete a series of questionnaires asking about their experiences of being diagnosed with and treated for head and neck cancer; they were also asked to provide a blood and saliva sample.  We are now contacting all eligible participants who enrolled in the Head and Neck 5000 study at least three years ago and are inviting them to take part in a follow-up study.  We would like to understand how patients' life and experiences of cancer have changed since their head and neck cancer diagnosis.  By analysing this information, we hope to be able to help other people with head and neck cancer in the future

PROSTATE

Genetic Cancer Prostate 

The causes of prostate cancer are unknown and the study aims to recruit 26,000 men to discover why prostate cancer develops. The research will involve studies investigating the causes of prostate cancer and factors that are associated with how the disease behaves and the effects of treatment. In particular, the study will be looking at the causes of prostate cancer developing in young men and those with a family history. The study also hopes it will help to understand the cause of the disease in patients who do not necessarily have a family history. 

Stampede


This study is called STAMPEDE (Systemic Therapy in Advancing or Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Evaluation of Drug Efficacy) and looks at the effect of adding new or different treatments to the standard way in which prostate cancer is currently managed.  This study aims to see if we can improve the way in which prostate cancer is currently managed i.e. by adding new treatments to the standard approach, can this enable men to live longer; or, by modifying the type of hormone therapy, live at least as long and enjoy a better quality of life.

TrueNTH

This programme is part of True NTH, which is a global initiative led by the Movember Foundation set up to address and improve the experience of men living with and after a diagnosis of prostate cancer. The True NTH network includes clinicians, academics, patients and organisations from across the UK, Canada, Australia and the US. Through this initiative Movember and Prostate Cancer UK are collaborating to identify and demonstrate the best and most cost-effective models for improving prostate cancer survivorship care and support. 


Add Aspirin

The study is testing whether taking aspirin regularly after treatment for early stage cancer stops or delays the cancer coming back.  The study is testing different doses of aspirin. Some people will receive a dummy drug (placebo). 

GASTRO-INTESTINAL

ESPAC-4

A study looking at combination versus single agent chemotherapy in respectable pancreatic ductal and ampullary cancers.  This study has been designed to find out whether one type of drug (chemotherapy) is more beneficial than a combination of two drugs when given after operation for patients with this condition.  Although the growth in the pancreas has been removed, there is a chance that patients could develop further growths sometime in the future.  Giving extra treatment with chemotherapy may stop this happening, but nobody knows for certain whether it is best to use a single drug or a combination of drugs.

GO2


The study wants to find out the best way to treat patients with advanced cancer of the gullet or stomach who may not be fit enough to receive standard 3-drug chemotherapy treatment.  This study is comparing four different treatment options. It is important to understand that none of the treatments in this study will cure the patient’s cancer.  Treatment options 1-3: Chemotherapy, at three different doses.  Treatment option 4: ‘Best supportive care’ with no chemotherapy.  This means providing care to help with the symptoms of cancer, as well as social and emotional support. 

Add Aspirin

The study is testing whether taking aspirin regularly after treatment for early stage cancer stops or delays the cancer coming back.  The study is testing different doses of aspirin. Some people will receive a dummy drug (placebo). 

HAEMATOLOGY


Horizons

Patients will have a diagnosis of either breast cancer who are under 50 years old, gynaecological cancer or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Recruitment will take place prior to treatment from hospitals across the UK.  This study wishes to look at how a diagnosis of cancer and its treatment affects a person’s life over time.

GYNAECOLOGY


Horizons

Patients will have a diagnosis of either breast cancer who are under 50 years old, gynaecological cancer or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Recruitment will take place prior to treatment from hospitals across the UK.  This study wishes to look at how a diagnosis of cancer and its treatment affects a person’s life over time.

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